Malted Sourdough Rye Bread

 I enjoy experimenting with bread. Sometimes it doesn’t work, and sometimes it does. This one is the latter. I made with grandma’s rye bread recipe as a base, I tweaked it to add sourdough starter and some malted barley flour. If you never used malted barley in bread, try it! It gives the finished product a really rich flavor.

rye

Here’s How to Make this Malted Sourdough Rye Bread

Making bread is a time consuming process. I use my kitchenaide mixer to do the first kneading and that saves some work (and some mess!). So let’s get this loaf started!

Mix the yeast with 1/3 cup luke warm water. Stir it around and let it sit until it starts to foam. If you don’t see some action in about 5 to 10 minutes, toss it and use fresh yeast. Yeast does go bad from time to time and this step will insure you have live, active yeast.

yeast

Put all the bread flour, rye flour, and all the other dry ingredients in a mixing bowl, then stir them around to mix.

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Put the butter and one cup of water in the microwave and heat until the butter is melted. Let it cool to room temp, then beat in the egg. Set it aside.

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Stir the starter and cream together to blend them.

Fit the mixer with the bread hook (or, if you me and don’t pay attention, use the paddle).

Run it on low while you slowly stir in the buttery water. When it starts to come together, turn the mixer to high and pour in the yeast, then the starter and cream. You made need to stop it once or twice to move the dough to the middle.

rye

Once you have a ball of dough, knead it in the mixer on high for about five minutes, or by hand for 8 to 10 minutes on a floured surface. The dough should be smooth and silky looking.

Lightly butter a large bowl and put the dough ball in it. Turn it once so there is some butter on both side.

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Cover it and set it in a warm place to rise until at least double in bulk, 2 to 3 hours.

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Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and give it a short kneading, maybe 3 to 5 minutes.

Lightly oil the surface of a pizza stone.

Shape the dough into a long loaf and place on the stone. Cover and allow to rise for about 30 more minutes. I scored the center, but you don’t need to do that if you don’t want to.

rye

Preheat the oven to 400°.

Place the loaf, still on the stone, in the oven and bake for about 45 to 60 minutes. The bread will be brown and sound hollow when you tap it.

Rub the top with butter and turn the oven off. Let it sit in the oven with the door ajar for about 10 minutes.

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Remove it from the oven and place it on a rack or a towel to cool.

RESIST THE URGE TO CUT! There is a lot of steam inside the bread before it cools. If you cut it too soon, it compresses the bread and you’ll have weird little dough spots where you cut it. But if you wait, this bread slices and holds together enough to make a sandwich!

Now that it’s cool, cut off a piece, slather it with butter and enjoy! You’ll taste the rye and the malt with a slight sour note.

rye

© Copyright 2021 The Lazy Gastronome

Malted Sourdough Rye Bread

A combination of two favorites with a twist. Malted barley flour adds a wonderful richness to the bread.

  • 1 Pkg active yeast (with 1/3 cup lukewarm water)
  • 1 stick salted butter
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup sourdough starter
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 4-1/2 cups bread flour
  • 1-1/2 cups dark rye flour
  • 1/4 cup malted barley flour
  • 1/4 cup buttermilk powder
  • 1 Tablespoon salt
  • Butter for the top and the bowl
  1. Making bread is a time consuming process. I use my Kitchenaide mixer to do the first kneading and that saves some work (and some mess!). So let's get this loaf started!

  2. Mix the yeast with 1/3 cup luke warm water. Stir it around and let it sit until it starts to foam. If you don't see some action in about 5 to 10 minutes, toss it and use fresh yeast. Yeast does go bad from time to time and this step will insure you have live, active yeast.

  3. Put all the dry ingredients in a mixing bowl, then stir them around to mix.

  4. Put the butter and one cup of water in the microwave and heat until the butter is melted. Let it cool to room temp, then beat in the egg. Set it aside.

  5. Stir the starter and cream together to blend them.

  6. Fit the mixer with the bread hook (or, if you me and don't pay attention, use the paddle). Run it on low while you slowly stir in the buttery water. When it starts to come together, turn the mixer to high and pour in the yeast, then the starter and cream. You made need to stop it once or twice to move the dough to the middle.

  7. Once you have a ball of dough, knead it in the mixer on high for about five minutes, or by hand for 8 to 10 minutes on a floured surface. The dough should be smooth and silky looking.

  8. Lightly butter a large bowl and put the dough ball in it. Turn it once so there is some butter on both side. Cover it and set it in a warm place to rise until at least double in bulk, 2 to 3 hours.

  9. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and give it a short kneading, maybe 3 to 5 minutes.

  10. Lightly oil the surface of a pizza stone.

  11. Shape the dough into a long loaf and place on the stone. Cover and allow to rise for about 30 more minutes. 

  12. Preheat the oven to 400°.

  13. Place the loaf, still on the stone, in the oven and bake for about 45 to 60 minutes. The bread will be brown and sound hollow when you tap it.

  14. Rub the top with butter and turn the oven off. Let it sit in the oven with the door ajar for about 10 minutes.

  15. Remove it from the oven and place it on a rack or a towel to cool.

  16. RESIST THE URGE TO CUT! There is a lot of steam inside the bread before it cools. If you cut it too soon, it compresses the bread and you'll have weird little dough spots where you cut it. But if you wait, this bread slices and holds together enough to make a sandwich!

  17. Now that it's cool, cut off a piece, slather it with butter and enjoy!

© Copyright 2021 The Lazy Gastronome

 

bread, Breads
American
bread, malt, malted barley, rye, sourdough

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