Dyngus Day Pierogi and Sausage

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 It’s Dyngus Day! What the heck is Dyngus Day? Well, Dyngus day is to Polish Americans what St. Patrick’s day is to Irish Americans. A day of festivities, parades and good food. But what is dyngus day?

No one really knows what started it or when, but it has evolved into a “wet Easter”. Boys throw water on the girls and the girls can get their revenge by throwing it back. Traditionally they are supposed to wait until the next day, but it’s done all day by both. The water is supposed to symbolize rain to bring good crops for the year. But the girls can protect themselves by offering the boys painted eggs as ransoms. These are believed to be magical charms that bring good harvests, strong relationships and healthy child births. But how ever you celebrate it, pierogi and Polish sausage are a delicious tradition!


dyngus day

I’ll be very honest – pierogi are not easy to make. Mine came out more like dumplings than the thin little noodles with filling! But they were tasty!

 

Here’s How to Do it:

Start by making the dough.

Sift together the dry ingredients,

then mix in the remaining ingredients in a medium bowl.

Gently knead the dough until it’s smooth.

Chill for at least two hours. Make the filling next.

Now for the filling.

Boil a whole, medium sized potato until it’s soft.

While it’s cooking bring out the other ingredients to bring them to room temperature.

When the potato is done, let it cool a little so you can handle it. Gently pull off the skin and push through a potato ricer. If you don’t have a ricer, you can grate the potato.

Mix in 2 Tablespoons of the onion

and the remaining ingredients and set aside. (a pastry cutter helps cut the cheese into the other ingredients and makes a smoother.)

Remove the dough from the refrigerator and cut it in half. Leave half in the refrigerator until you’re ready to use it.

With the first half, either roll it out extremely thin on was paper or a pastry cloth, or run it through a pasta machine. Remember, these are like ravioli – filled pasta.

Lay the sheet of dough out and cut into small circles, about 2 inches in diameter. You can use a cookie cutter or a small glass.

Put a spoonful of filling in the center of the dough.

dyngus

Gently fold it over, dampen the edges and seal around the sides. Keep going until all the dough is used.

dyngus

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil (about 1 teaspoon per quart of water). Carefully place each pierogi into the boiling water. It will rise to the top when it’s done.

Using a slotted spoon, lift it out of the water into a colander. Keep cooking until they are all done.

Next, melt some butter in a heavy skillet then add the remaining onion.

Cook until it’s starting to brown.

Place the pierogis into the hot butter and sauté until the sides are starting to lightly brown.

dyngus

Serve with sour cream and minced parsley with a side of Polish sausage.

dyngus

© Copyright 2020 The Lazy Gastronome

dyngus

Pierogi and Sausage

A delicious way to celebrate Easter Monday - also known as Dyngus day!

Course: Main Course, main dish, Side Dish
Cuisine: polish
Keyword: dingus, dumplings, dyngus, potato, sausage
Servings: 3 dozen pierogis (about)
Author: HelenFern
Ingredients
Dough
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1-1/2 cup all purpose flour
Filling
  • 1 large potato
  • 3/4 cup chevre goat cheese
  • 4 Tablespoons minced onion
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1 Tablespoon cream
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried, rubbed sage
  • 1/3 cup sour cream
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 4 Polish Sausages
Instructions
Dough
  1. Start by making the dough. Sift together all the dry ingredients.

  2. Then add the remaining ingredients in a medium bowl.

  3. Gently knead the dough until it's smooth.

  4. Chill for at least two hours. Make the filling next.

Filling
  1. Boil a whole, medium sized potato until it's soft. While it's cooking bring out the other ingredients to bring them to room temperature.

  2. When the potato is done, let it cool a little so you can handle it. Gently pull off the skin and push through a potato ricer. If you don't have a ricer, you can grate the potato.

  3. Mix 2 Tablespoons of onion and the remaining filling ingredients and set aside.

Making the Pierogi
  1. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and cut it in half. Leave half in the refrigerator until you're ready to use it.

  2. With the first half, either roll it out extremely thin on was paper or a pastry cloth, or run it through a pasta machine. Remember, these are like ravioli - filled pasta.

  3. Lay the sheet of dough out and cut into small circles, about 2 inches in diameter. You can use a cookie cutter or a small glass.

  4. Put a spoonful of filling in the center of the dough.

  5. Gently fold it over, dampen the edges and seal around the sides. Keep going until all the dough is used.

  6. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil (about 1 teaspoon per quart of water). Carefully place each pierogi into the boiling water. It will rise to the top when it's done.

  7. Using a slotted spoon, lift it out of the water into a colander. Keep cooking until they are all done.

  8. Next, melt the butter in a heavy skillet. Add the remaining onion. Place the pierogis into the hot butter and sauté until the sides are starting to lightly brown.

  9. Serve with sour cream and minced parsley with a side of Polish sausage. 

dyngus

Here are some things that are perfect to use for this recipe!

Disclosure: The items below are affiliate links through Amazon.com. If you purchase any of these products through the links, I receive a small commission at no cost to you. Thanks for your support!


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